The Muse
The Muse (1999)

Actor/writer/director Albert Brooks turns his satiric gaze on the film industry in this comedy about a screenwriter who has hit a rough patch. Steven Philips (played by Brooks) has enjoyed a celebrated career in Hollywood, but one day he… More

Directed By:
Rated: PG-13
Running Time:
Genre: Drama, Comedy
Release Date: August 1, 1999
DVD Release Date: May 1, 2001
Add Your Rating
Rotten Tomatoes™
Critic Score
53%
Flixster
User Score
34%



Critic Score: 53% Rotten Tomatoes™ Critic Reviews

Consensus: Despite quirky and original writing, the subject matter feels too removed to produce laughs.

Hillel Italie
Associated Press

"The Muse'' is an intelligent, undemanding comedy.

Full review…
Stephanie Zacharek
Salon.com

More stupefying than entertaining.

Betty Jo Tucker
ReelTalk Movie Reviews

Like the character he plays here, Albert Brooks needed someone or something to re-inspire him while working on this plodding comedy.

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Nell Minow
Common Sense Media

Satire, Hollywood in-jokes won't appeal to kids.

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J. Hoberman
Village Voice

The Muse is as consistently funny as it is smartly tooled.

Emanuel Levy
EmanuelLevy.Com

Albert Brooks' mildly amusing satire about the inner workings of Hollywood benefits from Sharon Stone's droll and sexy performance, but as a comedy it's too familiar and not funny enough.

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Owen Gleiberman
Entertainment Weekly

An embarrassment.

Roger Ebert
Chicago Sun-Times

Smart, funny -- and edgy.

Full review…
Rob Gonsalves
eFilmCritic.com

Brooks' gentle satire of Hollywood.

Full review…
More reviews for The Muse

Flixster Audience Score: 34% Flixster User Reviews
Lucas Martins
Original neurotic comedy, Albert Brooks' The Muse it's not very funny, dispite being entretaining.
Luke Baldock
It's gentle, warm and funny rather than being a hilarious attack on Hollywood. Yes it captures the natures of Hollywood fads and the shallow nature of the… More
Kevin M. Williams
Albert Brooks tale of a Hollywood writer facing the end of his career is unintentionally ironic and kinda sad to watch. The help of major Tinseltown players do… More
Leigh Ryan
Funny!
Jim Hunter
I normally like Albert Brooks's films. Obviously Broadcast News and Defending Your Life are fantastic, and in those films, his neurotic, Woody Allen… More
Jim Woehr
A screen-writer (Albert Brooks) who desperately needs inspiration get helps from Sharon Stone who has him convinced that she's a modern-day muse. Despite… More